Caring Masculinities September 15, 2023, 12-2 PM ET

25 August 2023

First Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Communities of Care featuring Tracie Canada and Antonia Randolph, with commentaries by J. Malton and M. Wallace

Migrant Domestic Workers October 27, 2023 12-2pm ET

24 August 2023

Second Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Communities of Care featuring Valerie Francisco-Menchavez and Grazielle Valentim, with commentaries by Anju Mary Paul and Pallavi Banerjee

Carcerality & Care. November 17, 2023 12-2pm ET

23 August 2023

Third Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Communities of Care featuring Joseph Hiller and Katie Von Wald. Commentaries by Micol Seigel & Marisol Lebrón.

Queering Care December 1, 2023 10am-12pm ET

22 August 2023

Fourth Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Queering Care featuring Nora Kassner, Tankut and Edward Nadurata. Commentaries by Pedro Augusto Gravatá Nicoli and Anjali Arondekar

Alternative Care Networks January 26, 2024, 12-2 pm ET

22 August 2023

Fifth Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Alternative Care Networks featuring Jieun Cho, Elizabeth Olson and Leiha Edmonds. Commentaries by Tatjana Thelen and Kim England

Race, Health & Disability February 23, 2024 12-2 pm ET

21 August 2023

Sixth Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Race, Health & Disability featuring Jasper Conner and André Marega Pinhel. Commentaries by Mairead Sullivan and LaTonya Trotter

Care Talk 2.0

18 August 2023

Welcome to Care Talk 2.0! In February 2008, economist Nancy Folbre launched the original Care Talk blog to reflect on research and policies regarding paid and unpaid carework. Written in a style that made material accessible to journalists, policymakers, and students as well as more seasoned researchers, the blog began with a focus on how to measure the economic contributions of unpaid care, the limitations of commercial models for care provision, and the problems that plague US systems of care provision.

Community Economies, April 19, 10-12 ET

9 August 2023

Seventh Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Communities of Care featuring Alioscia Castronovo and Lina Penati Ferreira. Commentaries by Lindsay Naylor & AbdouMaliq Simone.

Women’s Collectives / Colectivos femeninos, May 3, 12-2 pm ET

8 August 2023

Eighth Working Papers Seminar Series 2023-2024 Communities of Care featuring Natalia Hernandez Fajardo and Eva María Villanueva Gutiérrez , with commentaries by C. Cielo and Holly Worthen

Working Papers Series 2022-2023

24 July 2023

September 16, 2022. 11 am First seminar of the working papers series featuring Samia Akther-Kahn & André Pinhel.Commentaries by Anne Allison & Deborah Jenson Samia Akhter-Kahn, “Unpaid productive activities and loneliness in later life: Results from the Indonesian Family Life Survey (2000-2014)” André Pinhel, “Racial Classification Categories and Health Inequities Studies in Brazil and USA” […]

What is Care? A Photo Exhibition 

1 May 2023

In this photovoice exhibition, nine older people from Myanmar living in Mae Sai share their perspectives on their daily lives and what care means to them, shedding light on the importance of nature and religion. This participatory project was part of Samia Akhter-Khan’s PhD project and co-produced with Ben Lu, a 60-year-old woman from Myanmar living in Mae Sai. Pre- and post-comparisons of loneliness show that older people felt less lonely after the project, suggesting that photovoice may function as an intervention for loneliness among older migrants. The exhibition was curated by participants themselves, was exhibited live in Mae Sai and London, and is divided into four parts. The first part focuses on the definition of care and visualizes how older people provide for others

Care and Nature

1 May 2023

Part 2 of the exhibition shows how care is not only provided to other people but also to the environment. People care for and about nature by planting trees and growing vegetables. Being in nature has mental health benefits as it makes people feel at ease and helps relieve their worries and stress. As children and the government cannot be relied upon to provide care, older migrants from Myanmar need to rely on themselves, nature, and God